peer to peer lending

For too long, some of the best ideas have been held back because it's been too hard for them to raise money. With the economic tightening since the major debt crisis of 2007/8, and the increasing financial uncertainty of Brexit, borrowing money has become even tougher for entrepreneurs.
So why is it we are happy to work with peer to peer reviews now in every other aspect of our lives but we still see the content of sites like Glassdoor as somehow "different"? I believe the answer lies in the complexity of how we think about the world of work.
A recent career change has seen me join a PR agency which brings its own challenges and excitements as with any new job, but
I would like to thank Mr James Fierro, CEO of ECO Capacity Exchange for writing this article with me. Last Friday (25th September
Peer-to-peer lending is a booming market in the UK. According to the Peer 2 Peer Finance Association, cumulative lending
Peer-to-peer lending is now ten years old, with the first ever peer-to-peer finance platform Zopa, celebrating a decade in business this month. That decade has seen a dramatic change in the banking landscape.
Feeding a growing global population of nine billion people by 2050 is one of the world's biggest challenges--especially in the context of rapid urbanisation, rising amounts of food waste and climate change. During one day of discussions senior executives from agribusiness, policymaking and the NGO community examined approaches to food and nutrition security.
This would effectively create a hybrid kind of ISA, one which blends the benefits of both cash and shares. But for someone considering peer-to-peer lending to amplify a modest savings portfolio, is the extra potential return worth the exposure?
Excuse me if I'm stating the obvious but the banking system designed to lend to the beating heart of Britain's economy is clearly broken. The large banks have been beating the drum that they are 'open for SME business,' but the numbers coming from the industry show the exact opposite.
Central banks will set the official rate, and banks will always set their own rates. But now there is a third rate to consider - a more equitable rate; a rate driven by the crowd that you can influence. The market rate.