pet industry federation

We've repeatedly asked PIF to explain how pet shops might obtain puppies from responsible breeders but of course PIF has not even attempted a response, as by definition this is impossible; pet shops do not obtain their puppies from responsible breeders.
Serious health and behavioural issues associated with puppy farming are only compounded by the method of sale, so it's likely that the majority of puppies purchased from pet shops will be negatively impacted in some way from suffering such a poor start in life - even if not immediately apparent.
Our developed world is becoming an increasingly impatient culture. With every slight advance in technology the expectation
The Pet Industry Federation's logic for trying to improve the way puppies are sold through pet shops rather than conceding to accept a ban, seems to be based on the belief that being 'licensed, inspected, and open to public scrutiny' makes pet shops OK, and even preferable to private sellers.
The crux of the matter is simple. Can pet shops sell puppies well, meaning to at least the same standard as puppies sold directly from the breeder's home, and with no detrimental impact to their welfare? No they cannot. Unequivocally they cannot.
Just as we try to discourage people from buying puppies as Christmas gifts, animal welfare campaigners busily spread the word that the only kind of rabbit to give at Easter should be a toy bunny, or one that's made of chocolate.
You claim this Quality Assurance measure will ensure the "highest standards" are reached by pet shops but you do not appear to recognise that these ought to apply to the entire supply chain rather than just the sale premises - which rarely provide for the young puppy's emotional and developmental needs.
You support a ban on the sale of puppies anywhere unless their mothers are present and of course this includes pet shops, garden centres, online, and through puppy dealers. Brilliant. Now we are finally getting somewhere.