pet shops

As animal welfare campaigners, myself and my colleagues repeatedly highlight that trading puppies through third party sellers is inherently damaging to their welfare.
Government must introduce legislation that makes a real difference to pets bred and sold in the UK by empowering local authorities with sufficient resources and training they need to do the job. Anyone breeding or selling a pet must be held fully accountable for the welfare of pets in their care. Only then can Britain can truly start to live up to its reputation as a nation of animal lovers once more.
It should come as no surprise to anyone that the majority of excited, prospective puppy buyers want to be able to confidently buy a puppy that has the best possible chance of being a healthy, happy companion, and family member. In other words there's no real demand out there for irresponsibly bred puppies.
For the last seven years I've been glued to my TV on the night of Crufts Best In Show but not because I'm a huge fan of dog shows or of the 'spectacle' that is Crufts. It's because the minutes prior to the judge making a decision on which dog wins are the most anxious of the entire year for me as a campaigner against puppy farming.
Recently I had the great pleasure of attending the first ever 'Dogs in Society' conference arranged by APGAW- the All Party Group for Animal Welfare - a group of MPs, animal welfare organisations, and campaigners using the influence of politicians and experts to raise welfare of animals both nationally and internationally.
We've repeatedly asked PIF to explain how pet shops might obtain puppies from responsible breeders but of course PIF has not even attempted a response, as by definition this is impossible; pet shops do not obtain their puppies from responsible breeders.
This evil puppy trade is both cunning and sophisticated - knowing exactly how to manipulate public emotion, con local authorities and even forge documentation. It doesn't matter what your background or education is either - as long as you're prepared to part with your money you're fair game.
It would be a peculiar person that tried to argue that puppies are not adorably cute and fluffy. Thousands of pets for sale adverts flooding the internet show that pictures of puppies rarely fail to look sweet, they succeed in pulling on our heart strings and opening our purses. Cute sells.
Serious health and behavioural issues associated with puppy farming are only compounded by the method of sale, so it's likely that the majority of puppies purchased from pet shops will be negatively impacted in some way from suffering such a poor start in life - even if not immediately apparent.
Our developed world is becoming an increasingly impatient culture. With every slight advance in technology the expectation
It's never been easier to buy a puppy. The puppy farming industry is huge. In the past, many people bought from pet shops, or local ads, and that still happens, but nowadays, there are thousands of online sites listing millions of puppies for sale around the world, offering a smorgasbord of misery. The scale is mind boggling and hideous if, like me, you loathe the way our relationship with dogs has been infected by a consumerist, disposable way of life.
You claim this Quality Assurance measure will ensure the "highest standards" are reached by pet shops but you do not appear to recognise that these ought to apply to the entire supply chain rather than just the sale premises - which rarely provide for the young puppy's emotional and developmental needs.
You support a ban on the sale of puppies anywhere unless their mothers are present and of course this includes pet shops, garden centres, online, and through puppy dealers. Brilliant. Now we are finally getting somewhere.
This forthcoming debate is an exciting step in combating the cruel practice of irresponsible, unethical breeding of puppies and kittens in the UK, as well as the perfect opportunity to raise awareness, and educate the public about choosing a dog responsibly ie from ethical breeders e.g. Kennel Club Assured Breeders, or by adoption from legitimate rescue organisations.
I was surprised today, to find that we are still in the dark ages. As LA and other US states ban the sale of pet shop puppies, Harrods, one of the UK's most well known flag ship stores, still sells puppies in it's pet department.