Peter Wanless

For a number of years the NSPCC and several other charities and health organisations have been ringing the alarm bell about
Since the watershed moment when we discovered the extent of the utterly repulsive crimes committed by Jimmy Savile the number of reported sex offences against children has almost doubled. Last year our ChildLine service provided 3,150 counselling sessions- up 10% on the previous twelve months - for children, as young as nine, who had been targets of or were worried about being groomed online.
We should all feel "guilty" so long as there are still child abuse images on the internet, the head of the NSPCC said. Peter
The five things you need to know on Wednesday 9 July 2014... 1) OPEN UP YOUR 'DIRT BOOKS'! Will we see full disclosure? From
By any measure 1989 was a momentous year. The Berlin Wall came crashing down and idea of the worldwide web was conceived. There was also a ground-breaking report from a UK judge recommending a better deal for child victims of sexual and other assaults who gave evidence against their abusers.
There is a sad and recurrent theme in many of the worst child abuse scandals - of a child's voice not having been heard. Poor Daniel Pelka, seen looking through bins for food at his school but whose suffering at the hands of his mother and partner was not discovered until it was tragically too late...
The sharing of self-generated sexually explicit images or videos by mobile phone or online, is now commonplace amongst young people to the point that it is considered 'mundane' whether or not young people engage in it themselves. And it seems that lots do... Now, I know that young people want to experiment and explore their sexuality. And the thrill of taking risks and pushing boundaries is always going to be part of growing up. Frankly we are not going to stop sexting merely by instructing young people not to do it, or by pointing out that explicit under age images are illegal and they risk arrest. But I am deeply concerned that risks are not yet fully understood.