pharmacies

It's been a long-fought battle in the pharmaceutical industry. And now, consumer watchdog Which? has uncovered how some drugs firms are selling pain pills for 10 times the price of generic alternatives. It has never been a secret: it's just a matter of education.
Imagine the scenario: It's late at night and your partner wakes feeling desperately poorly with a headache. You run downstairs, check the cupboard, and realise that you're out of painkillers. Determined to help ease their suffering, you drive to the nearest shop, reach for the ibuprofen and take it to the till.
With mounting pressure on the NHS from chronic cuts to funding and ever increasing demand on all sides, our safety net is starting to come apart at the seams. There has been much debate around both the implications of this and measures to be put in place to ease the pressure. One such measure is to modify the way we use other resources like pharmacies to redirect some of the flow.
Every January, without fail, we are greeted with headlines about an NHS inundated with emergencies over the festive period. It seems that Christmas 2015 slightly bucked the trend with 'only' 278,000 attendances at A&E in the week leading up to the New Year, compared with more than 310,000 for the same period in 2014.
Our solution to this problem was to increase the number of languages and the number of pharmacies enrolled so that each pharmacy can give us fewer surveys and we can still hit data collection targets.
The five things you need to know on Friday, October 14… 1) GREAT BRITISH CAKE-OFF Donald Tusk seems such a mild-mannered
Community pharmacy is a part of the health service that bucks the inverse care law - there are more pharmacies per head of population in deprived areas than in more affluent areas. I speak for community pharmacists all over the nation when I implore you to bear this in mind as you pursue your aspiration of making Britain a country that works for everyone.
Last month the UK's largest ever healthcare petition was delivered to Downing street, containing 1.8 million signatures. Since then another 200,000 more patients, pharmacists and concerned citizens have added their concerns, asking that the government reconsider their ill-conceived plans to reduce investment in local pharmacies. Two million people have spoken, and all we are asking for is that the government simply listens.
As those of you who read these blogs regularly will know, plans to cut pharmacy services by what might be anything up to
You can’t avoid it; in every newspaper, every day, another story about the NHS under increasing strain from all areas. Statistics