Philippines Typhoon

For the few that fight against another Haiyan happening, hope and current action is not enough. More than offering help to the people of the Philippines, thre is a need to call for justice. If we don't have the will to fight for justice, we must at least lend a voice to all those like Yeb Sano, who do fight. Because just like poverty, restoring hope to natural calamity victims cannot be an act of charity, it must be an act of justice.
The Philippine island of Bohol is recovering from a double whammy - a 7.2 earthquake in October and then Typhoon Hainan 3 weeks later, but now they're keen to welcome tourists.
As a young woman living with a disability in a disaster-affected community Mavie faces even more challenges than most - Plan works hard to ensure that the rights and needs of children like Mavie are taken into account when planning for, and responding to, disasters like Typhoon Haiyan.As a young woman living with a disability in a disaster-affected community Mavie faces even more challenges than most - Plan works hard to ensure that the rights and needs of children like Mavie are taken into account when planning for, and responding to, disasters like Typhoon Haiyan.
Today we learn of the incredible British generosity in the storm's wake. Following the DEC Philippines appeal last November, it is expected that around 90 million pounds has been donated by people in the UK. That's a truly phenomenal amount, a proud achievement for a country where austerity driven cuts have had most people tightening their financial belts.
It has been a tremendous experience - haunting and inspiring in equal measure. We are at the one-mile mark of a long and challenging marathon which we must plan and implement well, while also being accountable and creative.
Gilda and Emma's green house is one of the few still standing on Tacloban's seafront, although some of the walls collapsed and it suffered severe structural damage. Photo albums, books and Christmas decorations are strewn over the floor. For the first few chaotic days after the disaster, Gilda and Emma took refuge in the local church. The building sheltered dozens of families who had lost their houses.
On about day 10 the mayor appeared and took charge of distributing relief goods. This involved men with automatic rifles, light and heavy machine guns, grenade launchers etc., protecting the relief boxes until the Mayor had shifted "the good stuff" into his newly commandeered storage buildings.
The magnitude of lost life is hard to comprehend. For most of the world's population, these tragedies - and others - are easy to forget when they are so far removed and life continues as normal. But what happens when tragedy hits close to home?
The typhoon in the Philippines reminded us all of Mother Nature's destructive power. Even in a technologically advanced 21st Century, we remain dangerously exposed to the worst she has to offer. But this doesn't have to be the case. We have the capability to utilise a wealth of information and state of the art scientific analysis to significantly improve survival rates when disasters hit.
The tragedy and loss brought on by the devastating Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines has triggered an overflow of generosity from the British public along with acres of media coverage. However quietly fading away from the daily headlines, Syria is also watching its children's futures cruelly slip away from them.