Photography Exhibitions

Much like the lyrics of a Springsteen song, this is a collection that seems to romanticise and reflect the lives of ordinary Americans, rather than a collection of portraits. And in that lies the lure of these incredible photographs. What a wonderful opportunity to see so many shots from a great pioneer.
If, like me, you're a fan of street photography and social documentary, you'll love Strange and Familiar at the Barbican Centre, a new photography exhibition that examines the changing face of Britain's landscape, its communities and its rituals over the past century.
Selfie culture may be a modern phenomenon but performing for the camera ain't nothing new. And how cameras have been used to capture artists at work and performance art is the subject of this new exhibition at Tate Modern.
Alec Soth is one of America's most celebrated contemporary photographers and this new exhibition at the Science Museum is his first major UK show.
Audrey Hepburn: Portraits of an Icon is a major new photography exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery that truly spans the life of this enduring star, from her early years in the Netherlands, through her years in London on the West End stage and then on to the height of her fame as an actress and fashion inspiration, and her later philanthropic work.
Human Rights, Human Wrongs at The Photographers' Gallery is a thought-provoking photography exhibition that examines the legacy of iconic images. Spanning the years from 1945 to the early 1990s, the exhibition reflects the major political upheavals, conflicts, wars and struggles against racism and colonisation that became particularly urgent after the Second World War...
Make Life Worth Living is a collection of photographs at the Science Museum taken by Nick Hedges between 1968 and 1972 of the impoverished urban housing conditions that many Britons lived in...
Timed to coincide with the First World War centenary, the Tate Modern has opened a new exhibition that examines wars and conflict in photography. But this is not a simple display of photojournalism.
The new exhibition of Guy Bourdin's photography at Somerset House presents us with a conundrum. There is no doubting the man's eye and talent for image creation, but these images were taken over 30 years ago and today, many of them are deeply uncomfortable, some of them arguably offensive.
The annual Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition is now in its fiftieth year. It is a global showcase of the very best nature photographs and I was absolutely blown away by the finalists on show in a stunning and moving display of their work at the Natural History Museum.