Placebo effect

Belief can be so strong that pharmaceutical companies not only use double- blind, but also sometimes triple-blind randomized studies to try to exclude the power of the mind over the body when evaluating new drugs.
Noting a case in which she administered tiny doses of a solution containing "common table-salt" in which there wasn't "a single saline property left", she reportedly cured a patient who had been "sinking in the last stage of typhoid fever".
In similar vein, stories of a health dividend from a "divine connection" - often called prayer - are slowly but surely being woven into the growing debate about the importance of life's immeasurables.
"The placebo effect is real, quantifiable and in fact you're doing quite well with an active therapy if you can get as good a response as the placebo response," said Professor Jon Stoessl, director of the Pacific Parkinson's Research Centre at the University of British Columbia.