politicians

Politicians aren't known to agree, but they did reach a consensus on one thing last week: how poor careers advice is in the UK. That's probably not surprising to anyone who's recently come through the school system, which is why representatives of the three major political parties are calling for huge improvements.
The key is to break money's link with status, or to remove the importance of status altogether. True happiness is achieved through introspection, gratitude, helping others and an acceptance of the world around us (see my previous blog). The greed and selfishness of accumulating wealth couldn't be further from achieving that.
This is not a series of individual failures. This is a structural economic failure which is resulting in acute human misery and frustration. It is limiting our prospects for sustained economic growth. It is a failure of politics and government.
Students should not be written off at this General Election. More needs to be done to encourage active participation but it is encouraging to see they want to engage. We hope more will follow in our footsteps at Staffordshire University and launch their own General Election campaigns, to mobilise their students and encourage them to have their say in May.
Sometimes it appears as if political comedy has disappeared, at least with regard to 'high' politics. Interest in politics - especially that involving Westminster - has diminished significantly.
When I joined all those years back I was sure that the UK Police should be unarmed. Now I can hear the cogs whirring. Ah, but now having been shot and had colleagues and friends lose their lives, you have now changed your mind! Actually no.
The thing is, politicians are getting their priorities all wrong. They're running around photoshopping campaign posters and trying 'out-norm' each other on Question Time - while what they should be doing is sitting down with a pie, some gin and and the Game of Thrones box set.
As May's General Election fast approaches politicians need to take note. With over nine million renters in the UK, policy needs to reflect their needs but, historically, parties have chosen to target older voters and homeowners.
"We won't raise taxes", "We will not allow university fees to go up", "We'll cut the deficit" and "Net migration will fall to 100,000." All of these are well-known, fairly recent 'promises' made by politicians which also happen to be, in effect, lies, as the matter was in their control and they failed to carry out on what they said, or pledges which could never be kept as it was not in the their power to do so.
So why do politicians appear to bottle the difficult decisions? The easy answer is that they do not want to take a chance with paying the electoral consequences of such decisions. The balance between 'winners' and 'losers' would be such that any government taking the action would be punished at the next election, it is said.