posh

In the media recently there has been, as their always is, people brandishing the 'public school' iron, tarnishing those of us who went to public school. The media is turning our education into a negative.
For the fading aristocracy whose magazine of choice is still Tatler, the phrase "state school" is as foreign as an Iceland
This little spell is not evidence that I am posh. Evidence that I'm a show-off? Maybe. Evidence that I'm a pretentious prat? Probably. It might even be evidence that I'm a bit good at writing essays on "Rings in Shakespearean Problem Plays". Evidence that I have managed a feat of social climbing which would make Becky Sharp damp-eyed with admiration? Certainly not.
Aged one, Harper Beckham has already learned how to smile for the cameras. She was papped whilst out with her mum Victoria
But moaning about posh popstars and the inevitable response from the media of championing "real artists" is a self-perpetuating cycle. For every Mumford and Sons, there's a Jake Bugg waiting by to call them out on their accents.
We have developed a shame around being posh. It's okay to laugh at someone who calls their father 'daddy, but not at someone who calls them 'dad'.
This media obsession with Oxford and Cambridge... creates an atmosphere of misplaced arrogance and grandeur within those institutions, it fuels the perception that we are ruled by an elite, impenetrable, Oxbridge club, and worst of all it intimidates poorer students away from applying to what are seen as alien institutions that only lets in posh kids.
Sherlock star Benedict Cumberbatch has revealed that he is considering leaving Britain because he is fed up with being attacked
Take a look at all of HuffPost UK's theatre reviews: According to recent headlines, politics goes hand-in-hand with another
Last Wednesday was the press night for my play, Posh, which presents a raucous evening with the Riot Club, an elite Oxford dining society. It's the first of my plays to make it to the West End, and therefore A Big Deal...