prejudice

I know what it's like to be ostracised by my own people.
At the risk of conforming to type and coming across all emotionally retarded and such, I offer these final thoughts to the author of the piece (you know who you are) - you can shove your casual sexism where the sun don't shine. And I mean that in the most adventurous and effusive way possible.
True acceptance and true respect must be based on the principle that even if you do not understand what is necessary for someone to actualise themselves as an individual, you will support their right to make the choice and defend their right to it.
I remember my careers teacher telling me that I should consider social work - as that was what a lot of black women went into. But I think, the pièce de résistance has to go to my history teacher who predicted me a 'C' at GSCE level. She told my mum and dad at another parent's evening that she did not place much hope in me on this particular subject. She also threw in that most black people ended up working as cleaners.
Sometimes there is a danger we can be so passionate about eradicating prejudice that it actually leads to us developing prejudices of our own. We fight so hard for the rights of some that we start to develop preconceptions about others whom we wrongly perceive to be aggressors.
The best way to eradicate hate is to educate our next generation. Parents and Teachers - your role in this will be invaluable. Teach our children that kindness, not hate, must form the backbone of the world we want to live in.
When I first read the article about Fergus Wilson, the buy to let tycoon who has banned coloured people from renting his
After all, a lack of diversity and constant discrimination makes our society weaker. Confronting and addressing our prejudices and unconscious bias would make us richer as people - less quick to judge, more ready to embrace and understand others.
I know I'm a funny lady because my mum told me so. And I see the fruits of my labour on the face of the person I'm talking to as it contorts into the kind of expression reserved for private appearances only. That's when you know you ARE bloody funny.
Obviously, people of colour provide such inspiration that it might seem irresistible to engage with this through a fancy-dress costume, but maybe think again. Go as Ginger Spice instead of a Geisha, Ali G rather than Jay Z and if you are after something more nostalgic, Andy Pandy as an alternative to a golliwog. Just please, for your own sake, don't bring out the face paint.