press regulation

He insisted he does not have a 'vendetta' against the press.
Max Mosley has denied money to fund press regulator Impress was put together by his father and 1930s fascist leader Oswald
Why would the government launch a public consultation on legislation that Parliament has already passed by an overwhelming majority? Might they be worried that voters are suddenly enraged or alarmed by some terrible injustice? Are they beset by fears of some kind of popular uprising?
This magazine, in common with other publications like the Daily Mail, The Sun, The Sunday Times, the Telegraph, the Express and the Daily Star and many local newspapers (mostly owned by multi-million pound parent companies, who lobby alongside us) knowingly misreported the law known as 'Section 40' currently subject to a new consultation by our good friends the Tory government...
So what is in the public interest? People are interested in a strange number of things: I have a young teenager, and what is not interesting for him seems to be anything I am interested in, unless I can sneak it up on him without declaring my interest first.
How good is your memory? Does it stretch back to 2013? Or perhaps 2011? Right now, David Cameron is hoping it doesn't. In those years he made a lot of promises that are no longer convenient for him, so he would prefer you forgot them.
In the last few weeks there have been significant developments in press regulation that have gone entirely unreported, despite the fact that they involve the most senior figures in the news industry, and despite that fact that they increase the dependence of the industry's new self-regulatory body, IPSO, on the major publishers.
As IPSO - the press' response to Leveson - opened for business this week, newspapers may be wondering whether they will be able to convince the public that it is not just a replica of its discredited predecessor, the Press Complaints Commission. No doubt IPSO will receive praise from newspapers themselves - at least initially. But will this be enough to paper over its shortcomings? Based on the public's response to the coverage of the Leveson Report and its implementation by the national press, the answer is no. It is highly unlikely that positive newspaper coverage will ever convince the public that IPSO is independent or effective.
A victim of a vicious stag attack has won a victory over newspapers which she said "trampled all over" her privacy by calling