prevention

For too long we have had a system that reacts to, but fails to pre-empt illness and ill-health; a system that responds, but does not prevent. In order to build a truly 'one nation' legacy Theresa May will need to develop policy that recognises that many of the wider causes of ill health lie upstream of the health and social care systems, not only addressing those with acute need, but preventing people needing that help in the first place.
This article aims to give a general overview of the current RVHD2 situation in the UK including information for veterinary
Going forward we want to lower the £9 billion that is unnecessarily spent by the NHS on type 2 diabetes each year, as well as improving people's health and wellbeing. We hope we'll then be able to justify that we are indeed a 'tech for good' startup.
It's a very challenging problem we face: how do we significantly reduce our spending on crisis care and acute treatment and start investing in tackling the problems that emerge early in children's lives. It will take brave decisions by leaders and commissioners to move in this direction. But we have to start doing it so that children and young people start experiencing the quality outcomes that we as a society should be able to provide for them.
What role should preventative medicine play in our health system? As the NHS is fragmented and funding for healthcare is cut, are we prioritising funding for treatment, over prevention? Or, is effective, and cost-effective prevention still worth prioritising?
Almost 70 years on, the NHS being underfunded, over-stretched and struggling to cope keeps making headlines...
While a sugar tax would certainly help to improve the public's health, it is only one measure, and will not be enough on its own. We shouldn't be tempted to see it a magic bullet answer to the high rates of obesity and Type 2 diabetes that we are seeing.
Have we been asking the right questions about protecting our health? Are more doctors and nurses the answer, or extra NHS funding? The election debates barely touched on health issues, particularly inequality and healthy lifestyles.
I often maintain, that the greatest long-term threat to our National Health Service comes not from the usual range of suspects people would immediately think of, but from diabetes and obesity...
In a world of coalitions, manifesto promises are even more open to change than they would be following a more predictable general election. As political ideologies will inevitably clash in any coalition agreement, compromises are going to be necessary.