prism

Mass surveillance of the internet by UK intelligence services has been unlawful in the past but now complies with legislation
The Internet is a vast place. Bigger than anyone, except a computer scientist, can imagine. It's a massive iceberg. What we see via Google and any other search engine is called the Clearnet and is potentially less than two per cent of what's actually out there, buried deep down in the Darknet or Deep Web.
Today, social channels have cemented themselves as pivotal elements in our communications ecosystems, helping us to manage our busy lives and stay connected at all times, but our attitudes to sharing are beginning to change.
Call me a whistleblowing geek - but I keep a poster of Daniel Ellsberg on the board above my desk. I'm an independent freelance
A Republican senator is to hit president Obama with a lawsuit on Wednesday that aims to halt surveillance by USA spy agencies
The Snowden revelations have indicated that the security services have engaged in legally dubious gathering and monitoring of our communications data. We know that they, along with some ministers, want the legal power to do this on an even larger scale. David Davis MP recently requested his mobile phone provider to give him all the data they held on him for a single year. What they gave him could fill a shelf and highlighted serious implications for our privacy that access to metadata can have.
Edward Snowden is presently one of the most controversial figures. When I Google him, headlines labeling him an 'American Hero' pop up while others tout him as a traitor. He has opened up an important debate about a citizen's right to privacy...
The majority of Brits believe surveillance whistleblower Edward Snowden is a hero, according to a survey, and have a far
Once more, the spectre of Prism haunts the news agenda. Edward Snowden, a wannabe Julian Assange (what a compliment, by the way) has been periodically releasing tranche after tranche of secret documents on British and American intelligence programmes.
Major terror plots against the UK have been foiled BECAUSE of email interceptions by GCHQ and other security agencies, according