prison system

Last week saw the long-awaited publication of Charlie Taylor's report on youth justice, which paints an inspiring and radical
That the speech took place at all was much more important than what was in it - the policies announced are all fairly small-scale and will have little to no impact if pushed through without comprehensive sentencing reform.
Over half of the 50 prisoners interviewed for the study reported three or more mental health problems including anxiety, depression, anger, difficulty in concentration, insomnia, and an increased risk of self-harm. Almost half of the 49 officers interviewed said that they would benefit from more mental health training and that further training should be offered.
It's much harder to allow them to fail, it's much more effort to turn the other cheek, and I hope that this review will shine a light on many of the steps we can all take towards supporting young people and helping them to achieve their dreams.
My dad is in maximum-security prison after an unreliable career in armed robbery. He already served ten-years and was finally promoted to an open prison - you know the ones - the kind we reserve for our white-collar criminals like celebrity politicians Jeffrey Archer and Jonathan Aitken. Annoyingly my dad didn't write a best seller in the last few months of his stretch...
The government's plan to close a further four prisons and build two new "super" jails has been slammed as an "absolute disgrace
A commitment to allow prisoners to re-enter society, as opposed to just letting them rot, has real potential to improve the outcome of our justice system for everyone. So go for it Chris, go for it MoJ, go for it prison bosses, and as citizens we need to play our part in supporting this agenda.
Since the August riots, the prison population in England and Wales (already one of the highest in Western Europe) has been on an upward trajectory, with new record highs reached in each of the past four weeks.