private tutoring

Having been in education for ten years, I've seen some real changes - all as dull as a Brexit talk at a vegan dinner party
The Easter holidays are upon us and with them exam season begins to raise its ugly head once more. It's the time of year when students freak-out, their parents lose sleep and whatever hair they had left and tutors rub their hands with glee as the work pours in.
In the upcoming weeks, the ancient, picture postcard cities of Oxford and Cambridge will become filled with the next generation
The world of work is changing. Nowadays you can set up a successful business with just a laptop and a good idea. Young people who have grown up with technology and embrace fast-moving trends are often best placed to spot a need in the digital market. It's not unheard of for teenagers to earn a fortune from developing new software or creating a brand new thing.
But is boarding school really that bad? Yes, there will be homesickness, especially for younger children, but in today's world of email, Skype and social media, you can be in regular contact with family, wherever they are in the world. As many parents work full time, kids who do live at home probably spend more time in school clubs or with nannies and babysitters than with their own flesh and blood.
Are there words that strike fear into a teacher more than "Ofsted is visiting"? Cue sleepless nights producing a week's worth of lesson plans, a rainforest's worth of admin and cross your fingers that little Jonny who fires paper planes from the back of the class, is off with a cold. Then of course, careers hang in the balance and self-esteem is shot if the inspector that sat in your class for half an hour deems your teaching to be unsatisfactory.
I want to muscle in on the latest playground scrap. After MP Matt Hancock suggested employers weed out privileged job applicants by asking them if they were privately educated, headteachers of some of Britain's top independent schools, including Eton and Westminster, have accused politicians - and the media that reported his thoughts so widely - of being "rude" about them.
Private tutoring is tantamount to "torture" and "child abuse", according to Gail Parkin, former President of the National
Clearly, tutors, summer schools and online education are here to stay. The advantages they offer to students are distinct and they are deeply embedded in the UK education system. The question cannot be how to stop them. Instead, we need to think about how to widen access to so that the most academically able can obtain access to the benefits of private tuition.
I would never try to dissuade anyone with a real interest in the subject from studying visual arts at BA level; it's hugely worthwhile and a thriving undergraduate scene is the lifeblood of the industry. What I would say, though, is that if you have a passion for art and design, but you also have interests and ambitions elsewhere, then don't be afraid to follow those other interests; you might be surprised at how those they come to drive your eventual artistic practice.