qe

Let us escape from the straightjacket imposed by the "moneymen", and invest in the future of Britain through Quantitative Easing for people.
Politicians and opinion-formers, please stop listening to the "moneymen". Go back to first principles and start using some common sense.
The UK consumer can look forward to further downward pressure on retail prices and this should lead to another increase in consumer spending. However, if the imbalances in the UK economy are to be addressed, British manufacturers urgently need to invest in order to increase productivity, which remains weak...
The dilemma in which Mario Draghi found himself over quantitative easing is emblematic of the state of the European Union as a whole. Like other of the EU's crisis management measures, the resort to QE has been criticised for being too little and too late...
If QE is a massive block of money (no-one's quite saying it's immovable) tending to pump up prices and spending, the precipitous fall in the oil price has resulted is a near-irresistible force working against it.
I am not opposed to turning on the money printing presses. But I am if the result is a boom to be followed by a bust with a few benefitting enormously at cost to many in the meantime. This is the time for QE, but Green QE is what we need and is not what we're getting.
So now we're all on tenterhooks until next Wednesday when we hear if the Fed has decided to reduce its monthly bond purchases. Traders, Treasurers, pension pot holders, emerging market Finance Ministers - we all feel a watershed is arriving.
There is a money tree, and it's called the Bank of England.
Sir Mervyn King surprised the markets on Wednesday after it was revealed he, along with committee members David Miles and
The Bank of England has held interest rates at a record low of 0.5%, they announced on Thursday. The Bank also left the scale