quarter-life

Depression or anxiety is an alarm clock designed to protect you long-term (even when it seems to be hurting you in the present moment): when you've woken up, and made the necessary changes in your life, it will have served its purpose.
Ask 5 people to tell you the 10 things they think you're really great at. Paint it loud and proud and don't brush it off. In there lies to the clue to what you'd be good at, and again, you might not be doing it in your day job.
So whenever this time of year rolls around and I'm getting reflective on what this year taught me, or what I can attempt to do better next year (as always: more exercise, less worry, more comfort-zone-exiting, less overanalysing) - I notice the random highlights that stick with me, the moments which remind me of the obvious 'lessons' I want to hold onto going forwards.
I was at an Escape the City event at Adam Street Club in London last night and I met this recent graduate - she had a sweet face, nervous laugh, and she kind of asked me for career advice...
What makes the quarter-life crisis of the overachiever different is the extent to which they deeply struggle with embracing their own individuality, particularly when it comes to separating themselves from their parents.