radicalisation

Some argue this indicates that Muslims cannot live alongside Western values and culture, that the two are fundamentally irreconcilable. But there is nothing in Islam to support such a view, indeed the Quran states that people are free to believe whatever they wish and makes clear that Muslims can fully observe Islam without living in a theocracy.
In the same way that the Muslim community have been active in challenging and preventing Islamic extremism, there needs to be more done at the community level to prevent far right extremists from influencing people. Supporting a national narrative of unity, diversity and coexistence is at the heart of prevention, and should not be undermined by our politicians or by sensationalism in the mainstream media.
Baroness Sayeeda Warsi has said it's time to press the reset button and ensure that this time the Muslim community is an equal partner in the fight against terrorism, but the question I want to ask is whether the government is brave enough to have the grassroots community around the table and start right at the beginning by clearly defining the problem we are addressing, as only then will we find a solution because for me, enough is enough.
The problem of radicalisation is a human one, but the issue of ideology is inextricably linked. Like an airborne virus waiting to strike when our immune system is weak, extremism permeates through society attaching itself to the vulnerable and cruelly imitating what they crave; identity, belonging and purpose.
With the 18th June attack on the Finsbury Park Mosque, we see the latest case of the low-tech murder and maiming of individuals
The arguments over how the attackers in London and Manchester were radicalised have veiled the fact that women and young people are tirelessly trying to speak up, and are often ignored. We are sick and tired of being held up as solely victims of gendered violence, when we also fight to stop it, by challenging outdated preachers and reviving new techniques of engaging with maligned people.
Not only does tending and befriending each other give us the strength to deter threats and comfort each other through the pain of loss, it can also prevent people from becoming radicalised in the first place. Let's face it no-one is born a terrorist: it's a terrible path they come to, often to the great distress of their own relatives.
In the wake of the London Bridge terrorist attacks, Theresa May has quite rightly called for unity within a society increasingly
Young people - who are both most exposed to the online world and the most vulnerable - need to be protected and shielded better than anyone. This education, between what is right and just and true, begins at home and in the school.
Identifying risk factors and vulnerability have been fundamental to safeguarding for decades, yet when Prevent adopts this same approach to reduce the risk of radicalisation, its critics label it "Orwellian".