raf benevolent fund

As the nation commemorates the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain this week and we honour those RAF veterans who, as Churchill said, "cast a glittering shield" to protect Great Britain, the RAF Benevolent Fund and its generous supporters worldwide have rallied in support the RAF family.
As the nation recalls the dark days of 1940 and honours the brave RAF airmen who fought in the Battle of Britain, the Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund is trying to help veterans who are having dark days today. Too often we hear stories of elderly veterans who have outlived their family and are spending their later years in solitude. But our new research tells a slightly different story.
In an incredible act of generosity the last surviving Dambuster pilot, Squadron Leader Les Munro, has decided to auction
Seventy-four years on, the heroism and sacrifice of these young men is the stuff of legend, romanticised and steeped in patriotism. So often portrayed with the iconic RAF moustache, the majority were probably too young to even have a moustache. Who were these men? How do they remember the Battle of Britain and what became of those who survived the years of war? What happened when they stopped being pilots, stepping out of uniform and back into civilian life?
We were briefed on 5 June that our operation would take place that night, through the hours of darkness, and we took off at midnight. The spoof raid was initially operated by eight Lancasters flying in line towards the French coast, two miles apart at a height of three thousand feet and a speed of 180 mph.
I always commemorate D-Day - I think it's important to remember, a lot of people lost their lives through this campaign. A lot of water has gone under the bridge since I ever talked about this, I think back and I was lucky to get away with my life.