recycle

How to give T-shirts new life and cut down on waste.
Bad news, kids. The UK’s recycling figures dropped for the first time last year, suggesting that we are by no means perfect when it comes to living sustainably. According to sustainable living advocate and Impossible labs co-founder Kwame Ferreira, we should be taking a (green) leaf out of other European countries’ books.
Bad news, kids. The UK’s recycling figures dropped for the first time last year, suggesting that we are by no means perfect
Even though Brits are known as a nation of tea drinkers, you certainly love your coffee too! Yet more often than not it's always 'to-go' with few choosing to sit down in a café to enjoy. This culture sees more than seven million cups of coffee purchased a day - and as well as a caffeine hit, this packs an environmental punch too.
As I sit, or more likely stand perpendicular and cramped, on my commute to and from work I tend to scan through the pages of the Metro or the Evening Standard nonchalantly. When I arrive at my destination, I have two primary options; put the paper in the bin, or leave it on my seat.
The news this week that there has been no slowdown in global warming highlights just how fragile our relationship with the environment is. It makes us question our individual role in contributing to big issues like global warming and think about the ways they can counteract the negative impact we, as individuals and businesses, have on the environment.
An amble through the trendier streets of East London will lead you towards a sustainable food revolution. Today, the area once popular with hawkers and those with interesting social narratives, is now a haven to environmentally switched-on foodies.
Today is the day that we fight this curse or rather lack of motivation and make resolutions that matter, resolutions that are for change, resolutions that give back!
You don't always need to have comprehensive sewing skills to be able to transform an item of clothing into something that's trendy, and on the cheap.
It's a similar scenario with most products that are sold as 'green' or 'sustainable' alternatives. Virtually everything we buy new leaves a hole in the ground somewhere, because raw materials are required to make any new product. Energy is required too, and that has likely been generated by coal, gas or nuclear power. That doesn't sound very green now, does it?