reducing waste

If you throw out one burger, the water waste is equivalent to a 90 minute shower.
Growing up, I remember faulty appliances being fixed by either my grandad or at a local repair shop - where a man with a never-ending array of tools would get the job done. We bought when we needed, not when we wanted. We wasted nothing. And I'm not talking about the middle of the 20th Century; I grew up in the late 90's.
Our present economic model, which could be described as 'take, make, dispose', has generated significant improvements in our standard of living, but is also harming us. According to the World Health Organisation, each year twenty times more people die of diseases linked to mismanagement of waste and pollutants than die from malaria.
Image: pixabay.com "I'm not allowed to do that" is a phrase that I seem to be hearing all too often these days. You might
This time last month, I was halfway through three weeks working at Glastonbury Festival. This meant that I was able to see the 'Early' week, final build up of all the stages and areas, as well as the Show Week in which the market vendors and last staging equipment poured in, joined by 175,000 others from Wednesday onwards.
With all the investment in behaviour change campaigns and infrastructure, why is there still material that can be recycled going into the bin in our homes? Only half of all plastic bottles are currently sent for recycling, revealing a significant gap between the strong environmental values people profess and their behaviour.
The question is how do you find and finance solutions to these problems - that aren't sexy, lucrative or easy to solve - and where solutions are likely to be found at grassroots, by people who are close to their communities, who might not find it easy to source funding on the high street?