referendum brexit

This week, as the dust settles on the general election and we attempt to comprehend the unpredictability of British politics, Brexit negotiations have begun and we mark a year since an historic referendum which decided the future direction of our country. To say that we live in uncertain times would be an understatement.
If that is not done, an exit of the UK from the EU and its subsequent consequences may be carried out without any democratic mandate or legal basis whatsoever. History may not treat that fiasco kindly.
We need more people to realize cybersecurity is an interesting and exciting career so we can have the skills and expertise for the future that we need to protect people, governments and organisations from the menace of professional cybercriminality.
We have to turn up, and keep turning up, and show that we believe equally as hard as they do, and that respect and acknowledgement of the rights of our fellow humans, no matter their skin colour, country of origin, gender, sexuality or whatever differences we may have, are the core values of the society we want to live in. Democracy is the single most important construct our society has ever developed and, whilst it has flaws like everything else, it's beautiful, and it works when we turn up.
We are right to value democracy, and to demand free, fair, regular, competitive elections. But an election is not an end in itself. Elections do not guarantee freedom or good outcomes. Democracy is much more likely to function well, when the rights of all are guaranteed by independent courts, even if this offends the majority. And elected governments are much less likely to become tyrannical when the people keep tabs on them through a free press, and when people are willing to protest. In fact, and this is not an alternative fact, every healthy democracy needs trouble makers.
Still in shock from May's speech. I expected more subtlety... but she gave us 'Global Britain', jingoism. and bravado: "No
David Beckham, England footballing legend and globally respected brand ambassador made headlines yesterday by publicly backing the campaign to remain in the EU. Celebrity backing of a political campaign can have ramifications for both the credibility of the campaign and the celebrity themselves.
After months of anticipation, heated debate and brash headlines, tomorrow the UK takes to the voting booth to decide its
Existing provisions under UK law are by no means perfect, but they are only in place because of EU law in the first place. EU law has closed dangerous loopholes in UK discrimination law which could open again. Necessary future developments could face a brick wall without the EU jurisprudence. Working women will undoubtedly be the losers in a post-Brexit world.
What's more, if England, Wales, or Northern Ireland win their group, the joy could resonate into feeling good being part of Europe. Lose of course, and that changes the mood. Nothing does this quite like football. You can guarantee that the English national team will have a say on how people vote come June 23, win, lose, or draw.