Rhinos

For many of us it does seem kind of strange that there is still an ivory market of any kind. There's nothing pretty about seeing the remnants of a dead elephant on your wrist or mantelpiece. For most it isn't only times that have changed - our attitudes and understanding have too.
It's been a busy few weeks for wildlife globally! At the very end of April, Kenya made a statement to the world that there
Official figures released in South Africa have shown a slight decrease in the number of rhinos poached in 2015. In the first
Last year, we witnessed some incredible highs but also some terrible lows for Africa's wildlife. From lions to elephants
This weekend presents a big opportunity to make our concerns for Africa's elephants known to our political leaders. Elephants might 'trumpet' and be able to communicate by infrasound - but at the political table they don't have a voice and we must be theirs, shouting loud.
According to Europol an elephant dies every 15 minutes at the hand of poachers and it's been estimated there are now fewer lions in the whole of Africa than black cabs in London. These facts break my heart - we cannot let our grandchildren grow up in a world where these beguiling creatures no long roam wild by confining them to the history books.
A zoo has welcomed new arrival Bruce the baby rhino, weighing in at almost eight stone (50kg). Bruce was born at Blair Drummond
Rhinos are ridiculously endangered. There are less than 30,000 in the wild, down form 500,000 in 1900. And there's little
Something historic happened in London on 13 February. Representatives from 41 countries, plus the European Union and a handful of multilateral environmental agencies, came together for the London Conference on the Illegal Wildlife Trade.
Sadly, there are millions of humans who want to see rhinos dead. Most of them are in the Far East. Humans who think the horn of the white or black rhino can be ground down and ingested to improve their sex lives, cure cancer or ward off evil spirits. Humans who are prepared to pay heavily-armed poachers to shoot and maim these animals, hack off their horn and ship it half way around the world to China. It's the new drug trade in Africa, a multi-million dollar industry that commands $65,000 a kilo for rhino horn. An average rhino horn is about 5kg. It's not hard to do the maths.