right to be forgotten

I use the word 'protection' deliberately because in many ways the proliferation of images on the Internet is a form of abuse. An abuse of the individual's right to a private life, an abuse of the (rapidly disappearing) innocence of childhood, and in some cases actual literal abuse.
A UK businessman has a reached a settlement with Google after going to court to have numerous malicious references to him
The media in general and online editors in particular are not necessarily the bad guys here, far from it, they mostly just stick to their journalistic ethos... A possible solution could be that, after a set number of years, the article would either de-index itself or anonymise the individuals it cites. Some kind of "digital rehabilitation act" if you will, or a self-triggered right to be forgotten.
The European Court of Justice ruling this year is a watershed moment for the info sphere - it redefines the individual's relationship to his/her online data, not to mention presenting a practical quandrum for search giants like Google.
On Thursday October 23rd the Cambridge Union Society hosted a debate sponsored by Mendeley about the right to be forgotten online, and voted to oppose the motion. Gabriel Hughes, VP of Analytics at Elsevier and a former executive at Google, outlines his own stance in opposition and reflects on the overall debate.
The 'right to be forgotten' law is now in full swing. Google has removed more than 60,000 web links and some days it seems like every search you do has the italicised warning at the bottom of the page: Some results may have been removed under data protection law in Europe. Learn more. Strange wording isn't it? Let's face it - some results have been removed, Google, or the italics of doom would not be there.
The BBC has confirmed that it will publish a constantly updating list of all its articles that have been removed from Google
The Street Camel of News It's been a good week for broken ground. UKIP, after nearly twenty years as an entity, finally won
Britons have asked Google to remove more than 60,000 web links from its results under the "right to be forgotten" law, the
The council will examine the tension between the basic principles of privacy and the public's right to know - the main concern with this controversial ruling.