rock n roll

“I’m pinching myself,” says Virgin founder.
It was 1964 and singer Genyusha “Goldie” Zelkowitz had a problem. The all-girl band she formed in 1962 with drummer Ginger
Keith Urban thanks legend for his “poetry, passion and potency.”
The guitarist was known for a string of 1950s and ’60s hits.
These two artists couldn't be any more different, yet each had enormously prolific outputs that have influenced culture directly and indirectly. These two careers that cannot be summed up adequately in short order.
This month saw the release of two full-length concert films with accompanying CDs and vinyl, from the 1975 Tour of the Americas and the Tattoo You trek of 1981. The Tour of the Americas was Ronnie Wood's first tour of duty, busy and fleet fingered around Keef's frankly brutalist, angular riffing at its crushing, decadent, sloppy best.
It seems remarkable that almost 25 years later I found myself sitting in the old Olympic Studios where the band recorded a load of their classic records. In front of me was a grey-haired Jimmy Page, the composer who so let me down on the first hearing, but whose body of work has inspired me through my entire adult life.
There were crowd crushes, there were flares, there were naked guys climbing up towers and there were bloody noses. But aside from all the ominous scenes and injured gig goers that have dogged the headlines since Saturday, The Libertines at Hyde Park was a much needed injection of much-missed rock and roll.
At this year's Brit Awards, Alex Turner from the Arctic Monkeys, used his acceptance speech for Best Album of the Year to announce that "rock n roll will never die." He then threw the mic he was using down on the floor and mumbled "invoice me for the mic if you wanna."