Rohingya Muslims

The pontiff defended his silence while in Myanmar on the humanitarian crisis, saying he spoke privately to the nation’s leaders about the issue.
The Rohingya Muslim minority in Burma have been described as one the most persecuted minorities in the world by the United
How is it that the year is 2017, and people are still being murdered for their ethnicity and religion? When I was a child
We don't want to believe that people can be so cruel and inhumane towards one another. Yet visiting the camps, it is hard to not be moved by the horrific treatment of the Rohingya people. This persecution is a stain on humanity and having met them - having seen their suffering - it is our duty to make sure the voices of the Rohingya people are heard.
The last fortnight's spotlight on the Rohingya people of Myanmar has uncovered a ghastly truth that they are facing state sponsored genocide. In an address to the UN, Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights denounced the "brutal security operation" against the Rohingya in Rakhine state, which he said was "clearly disproportionate" to insurgent attacks carried out last month.
Once known for being one of the world's most prominent political prisoners, Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi has remained deadly silent as the Rohingya, "the world's most persecuted minority" have been slaughtered on her streets.
I am proud to lead a student movement that has behind it a history of fighting for global peace and justice. A National Union that so often speaks out even when "society isn't ready." But right now, our silencing on the violence against the Rohingya is deafening.
2015 could be the most important year in Burma's recent history. The November general elections are the litmus test for the reform process which began in 2011. Successful elections would consolidate a remarkable, peaceful transition from dictatorship.
While the EU continues to struggle with the Mediterranean refugee crisis, South East Asia has been facing a potential catastrophe as Burma's Rohingya flee their homes in search of safety across the Andaman Sea. The scenes of thousands of people stranded on boats and the harrowing discovery of mass graves have recently commanded the world's attention, but the Rohingya minority's desperation is not new and they are no strangers to injustice.
The international community must realise that the only solution to end the suffering of the Rohingyas lies with the Myanmar government. We must pressure them to end the atrocities that they are committing towards these people. The Rohingya minority must be allowed to return to their country and live peacefully in the place that they call home.