Ron Paul

Mrs Clinton does not deserve pity. Her own record coupled with an ill-deserved sense of entitlement to the top job in US politics was her undoing. A great deal of Americans however, whether they believed in her or otherwise, do deserve pity.
Paul is a divisive politician, beloved by younger Republicans, untrusted by religious and social conservatives and feared by the party establishment. Yet it is his non-interventionist worldview that represents the biggest threat, particularly to the neocons for whom perpetual war offers the healthiest returns.
NEW YORK -- Rand Paul is running for president. Announcing his candidacy in Louisville, Kentucky, on Tuesday, the doctor
Democracy is only as legitimate as the freedom it guarantees its citizens. Freedom of thought, body and conscience are denied to Israelis as long as it continues to force unwilling teenagers towards war.
A year later and the black flags of the Islamic State (formerly ISIS), currently fluttering across lands from from northern Syria to the Iraqi province of Diyala north-east of Baghdad, have once again pushed the noxious issue of intervention to the forefront of the US foreign policy debate - a discourse that is further dividing an already fractured Republican Party, with the question of action versus non-action likely to run all the way to the 2016 election.
Unlike in the UK, where you have viable alternatives to the two prevailing parties (I am particularly enamoured with the Monster Raving Loony Party), the Republicans and Democrats in America have created high petition thresholds for ballot access that make it next to impossible for third parties to compete.
The merits of Obamacare, how to fix the economy, taxing the super rich, cutting the deficit, balancing the budget. Let's face it does anyone really listen to what the candidates are saying on these issues anymore? The Republicans hate Obama but right now they hate each other too and without a front runner, all of the candidates and issues are just turning into one homogenous political advert of bitterness and hate.
If there is one hard and fast rule about this year's primary, it's this: there are no hard and fast rules. In fact, as the 2012 Republican primary progresses, it increasingly resembles the 2008 Democrat primary.
Over the past months we have seen the main candidates to the GOP nomination in the United States racing towards the ultimate price, the chance of challenging Barack Obama in the presidential elections to be held later on in November this year.
As the first Republican presidential candidate -- except for a sitting president -- to sweep both Iowa and New Hampshire, Mitt Romney seems poised to capture South Carolina this Saturday and go on to win the nomination of his party.