Royal Academy of Arts

Moroni is widely regarded as one of the finest painters of the 16th century, and a critical innovator in portraiture, in particular. Yet his name is not widely known by the general public so this new exhibition at the Royal Academy, the first ever large-scale display of his work outside Italy, is an important contribution in correcting this.
Allen Jones' work doesn't really offer us any thing new and further still it rides on the back of the exploitation of women to his benefit. Even more depressingly he seems to have learnt nothing in the past 40 years: his empathetic faculties seem to fail him, as do his technical abilities.
Allen Jones is considered to be one of the finest pop artists of the 1960s but as creator of pieces such as Chair and Table, where female sex doll figures are contorted into everyday pieces of furniture, have secured him a reputation as a figure of controversy.
Anselm Kiefer is widely considered to be the most influential artist working today. However he is not a household name. With this in mind, this new exhibition at the Royal Academy succeeds in not only showcasing a broad range of Kiefer's extraordinary work, but also in bringing much depth and context to the pieces on show.
Whatever preconceived ideas you have on 20th Century South American art, prepare to have them thrown out the window in this sensational exhibition at the Royal Academy.
Dennis Hopper is probably as well-known for his reputation as a hellraiser as he is for his acting and filmmaking. But he was also a wonderfully talented photographer and it's this talent that is the focus of this revealing and surprisingly emotive exhibition at the Royal Academy.
Practically a national institution, the annual Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts is the world's largest open entry exhibition, which showcases new and recent art from emerging artists to the biggest names in contemporary art and architecture.
You'd expect woodcuts to be quite dry, with the images rigid and lacking in artistic expression but not at all. The technical expertise in the 150 prints the RA has brought together is such that there is great detail in these prints with bodies outlined in curving sculpting lines, and cross-hatchings used for shadow.
I was surprised, saddened at just how bland the works on show were. There were exceptions (thankfully) but so little of the collection showed any kind of verve, inventiveness or challenging commentary.
Minimalism has evolved in the last years from a reaction to Abstract Expressionism to a fusion of different art movements such a Conceptualism and Arte Povera and it is becoming more prominent in the Arts scene.