royal british legion

Red is alarming, uncompromising, empowering and fierce. As a society, we're hard wired to it since it taps into our primal, passionate impulses. It's the colour of the blood of Christ and also the Devil, with a cocktail of connotations consisting of fireworks, adrenaline, love hearts, red roses and indeed the aptly named districts where certain women make a living.
We have a choice when it comes to poppies. We have rights to freedom of expression because our ancestors campaigned for these rights (not because they were handed down to us by the establishment). We can maintain those rights only if we continue to exercise them, despite the massive social pressure to follow the establishment line. The language of "not political" is only one more aspect of the pressure to conform.
So it's November and the beginning of November has always been synonymous for me with the Royal British Legion's Poppy Appeal. Normally I am working and the appeal just drifts around me. I buy my poppy and I might watch the Remembrance service from the Royal Albert Hall or the Cenotaph if I'm free.
90% of people killed in war are civilians. But apparently civilians don't count. Remembrance is only for armed forces personnel from the UK and allied states.
The nation is preparing to fall silent this morning to mark Armistice Day and remember those killed in Britain's wars. Veterans
There is no contradiction in wearing both a red and a white poppy. This Remembrance Day we should remember those who have given their lives for our freedom, and also take a moment to question the causes and consequences of war.
The support our injured soldiers and bereaved families receive is unrecognisable from our predecessors and it is a comfort to a serving soldier now if he gets injured or he pays the ultimate sacrifice. He and his family will be looked after by a first rate support system providing both for them financially with lifelong help available if required.
Picture of Olive Cooke's wedding day Nov 9th 1940, when she married Leslie Hussey-Yeo “Her death is a big loss to the city
Much as I relish the creativity of many of their efforts, I feel that this trend tells a worrying story both about the faltering attempts of business to redefine its place in the world and about our own need to grasp at almost anything to create meaning in our lives. In my book, we could do with rather more powerful stories at Christmas time. Any ideas?
Police are hunting a thief suspected of stealing a poppy collection tin from a Sunderland Fish and Chip shop. The man is