Rwanda genocide

No one in Rwanda spoke of the genocide of 1994. That was the first thing I noticed. President Paul Kagame has been the head of state since the genocide, and he has been instrumental in ushering in change. He's taken big steps to challenge ethnic division, transforming the country into one nation of Rwandans.
July 4th - America's day of independence and freedom. It was also the day twenty years ago that the genocide was brought to an end in Rwanda - not by foreign hand but by the remarkable military campaign of the rebel army led by Rwanda's current President, Paul Kagame...
Legal experts, academics, and NGOs working in Burma identified key elements of genocide which are taking place there. These included denying Rohingya legal existence and right to nationality; access to medicine, food, and other basic necessities to sustain life...
2014-1915 = 99 Just utter the words 'Armenian genocide' or mention the date '24 April 1915' to any Armenian in any corner
As we commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the three month Rwandan genocide, we realise that the capacity for greatness in a human being and its polar opposite, the capacity for evil, is something we should never underestimate.
The genocide ultimately reminded the world that Africa is still part of the geostrategic calculation - of which Rwanda's migration from Francosphere to Anglosphere is merely totemic...
Weeping and grimacing, dozens of spectators at the Rwandan genocide memorial in Kigali have had to be carried from the stands
In 1994 in the space of 100 days up to one million people were killed in Rwanda, in a calculated act, fueled and perpetrated by Hutu extremists in the then ruling government. It was one of Africa's defining moments, and one of the greatest crimes against humanity of the late 20th century, causing a shock wave across the world that still echoes today.
On this day in 1994 the Rwandan genocide was unleashed. Extremist members of Rwanda's Hutu majority set about slaughtering Tutsis and moderate Hutus, irrespective of age or gender. More than 800,000 people were killed in 100 days of murder, rape and torture. I am in Rwanda today to commemorate the genocide, pay respect to the victims and honour the ordinary people of Rwanda for their remarkable efforts to rebuild their country after experiencing unimaginable horrors. But today we must not only pause and remember the genocide, its victims and survivors; we must also reflect on the lessons of that experience...
Gloriose, 25, was only five years old when her parents we killed in the Rwandan genocide Elder brother Flouduard witnessed