safe spaces

Universities should introduce “brave spaces” to allow students to air offensive or controversial views, a leading academic
Some people might label these events as 'one offs', and decide it's not worth 'making a fuss' by reacting. But in fact, this editing is the lesbian, gay, bi and trans community's response to structural oppression and discrimination (something that all marginalised communities have to deal with on a daily basis.)
I think you can't and shouldn't vaccinate or insulate yourself against being offended. But in these highly insecure times, you can't be surprised if people try. Safe spaces are surely a symptom more than anything else.
It isn't steps like safe spaces or no platforming adopted by our students which have stopped "innovation of thought" and threatened how we "develop as a country, society and economy" as May suggested. For that the Prime Minister should take a look at herself and her government.
In some ways, it's crazy that I have to expand on this post past the title. I will expand, but first let me repeat that - creating safe spaces for women is not sexism. In fact, denying women safe spaces is far more sexist and discriminatory.
The five things you need to know on Thursday, September 15, 2016… 1) NUCLEAR STRINGS THEORY The row over Hinkley, with its
You should realise when you are riding roughshod over someone's pain and should f*****g shut up and listen a bit if you actually want people to engage with your point of view, and maybe agree to disagree. Instead of feeling they have to run away, or block their ears and go la-la-la. Or no-platform you, which is the institutional equivalent.
No-one in this discussion is honestly questioning anyone's "right" to hold such views - they are simply pointing out the ramifications of doing so. "No platform" calls - when actually made - are often taken by those who already feel marginalised and want to kick back against that which they consider to be a negative or oppressive force.
Instead of criticising the methods of those students stepping up to try and help their peers, we can admire their compassion, and respect their determination to plug a failing support system. And if civil liberties campaigners don't want this to deteriorate into censorship then they can join efforts to make sure that adequate support exists.
Black women are more vocal than ever. We no longer bat an eyelid at the "angry black woman" cliché that haunted our mothers, or the "aggressive" label that was tacked onto any black schoolgirl who was insolent enough to do anything but sit silently. We say what we want, and we won't suffer fools gladly, and at some point the rest of the world will learn to deal with that.
For me the debate about whether the statue of Cecil Rhodes at Oriel College, Oxford should be removed encapsulates the crux of the debate and whilst many recognise that there are things to be commended in the arguments made on both sides I find myself agreeing with both sides, at the same time.