Samantha van Dalen

The human condition is farcical, tragic, horrid yet ecstatic and over-the-top-wonderful occasionally. I am reminded of our insignificance by observing nature. I am seeing the same cycle over and over again now in a spring already fading.
I recalled this happy event recently. His name was Wayne and we kissed as How Deep is Your Love by the Bee Gees played in the background. I was 13 years old and he was 16. I remember being completely enthralled and in love. That was then.
A pot-smoking friend once regaled me with his theory of a collective human consciousness, his idea being that supposedly we are all connected by some sort of invisible net that links our minds. I remember laughing heartily at the concept as I inhaled secondary smoke while thinking this is what drugs do to one's brain- invent wild theories without any foundation whatsoever.
That famous line from the theme song from MASH, the popular TV show where American medics satirised their lives in the firing line in Vietnam. As a child I remember being enthralled by the words of that song and the concept that indeed, suicide could be painless.
There is a saying in Latin- a language I continue to vainly attempt to learn. Utendum est aetate; cito pede labitur aetas. We should make use of time for time slips quickly by. - Ovid.
Peter and I talked about bees and the recent initiative at the farm to promote beekeeping. Peter also shared some of the dark, despicable secrets of the commercial bee-keeping industry where bees are literally exploited to death. None of these practices, it should be said, are the biodynamic way.
I have solved all of my problems in life by walking. There is a Latin phrase for it: solvitur ambulando. It is solved by walking. Some may find it amusing or outlandish that problems can be solved by the humble stroll but consider this.
Albertina- this gentle pensioner had recently lost two grandchildren- one in a road accident and the other from a heart attack. She had just returned from comforting her daughter who is 'coping' with the loss of her two children. Albertina is teaching herself French to take her mind off her lost grand kids...
write as a middle -aged woman and one who is quite delighted to be on the cusp of fading away into the sunset. Once the menopause has passed we feel a pang of sadness at the lost opportunity to ever have kids but we look back with clear lenses instead of rose-tinted ones.
I can remember almost nothing of my primary school days because I hated school. Did I learn anything back then? All a mystery to me, although someone clearly taught me to read and write.