Savile Row

So, what do male customers want? What's driving these preening peacocks? We know that shopping in itself is not the attraction, so it's down the clothes. As buyers prepare to open their order books, they might reflect on the words of the talent that was Alexander McQueen:
Historically, the term luxury has always been a standard of quality, a mark of authenticity and shielded by a veil of exclusivity. But now the term is increasingly being owned by high street brands looking to squeeze a few more pennies via some nice packaging, leading to this dearth of 'luxury' options.
The shop at 2 Marshall Street in Soho is something of an Aladdin's Cave, the headless mannequins in the window the sharpest
Chris Kerr possesses an air of watchfulness, borne perhaps from looking out into Berwick Street from the cutting board which sits at the front of his Soho shop. The spectacles he wears are of heavy acetate, the navy suit fitted with little give, the whole look rounded off by black brogues and a metal watch.
Crombie's autumn/winter 2012 collection possesses what you would expect from a company that has dressed the likes of the Duke of Windsor, Winston Churchill, Cary Grant, The Beatles, JFK and Barack Obama: and that is ineffable classic style, but with a modern twist. Jason Holmes met Crombie's head of wholesale Gordon Ritchie to try on the king of coats
He may be the world's one and only male supermodel, but David Gandy is also the most humble, sweetest most down to earth guy you could ever hope to meet. Despite being in an ego driven industry, this boy has his feet firmly on the ground.
Mark Powell has a glint in his eye and his handshake is firm when he greets me in his Marshall Street shop. As one would expect from a man born in Poplar, east London, he has a no-nonsense attitude. At 50, he remains one of London's most iconic and influential bespoke tailors, having made suits for Mick Jagger, Ronnie Kray, David Bowie and Harrison Ford.
Anyone who takes the slightest interest in contemporary menswear will confirm that bespoke tailoring and the appreciation of historical designs and techniques stand at levels of fascination for designers and male consumers that had not been seen for decades. The recently opened "Tommy Nutter: Rebel on the Row" exhibition at London's Fashion and Textile Museum is a timely and meaningful event.