second hand smoke

Parliament has opened the door for legislation that would prevent children from being exposed to second-hand smoke in cars
"A ban would be the nanny state going too far"? People once described the law against drink-driving as an example of the nanny state going too far, telling people what they could or couldn't do in their own car. Yet most now accept it as sensible. Other than being about protecting children within the car rather than pedestrians and other drivers outside, this law would be exactly the same. And given the number of children it affects, the benefits for the nation's health could be equally if not more dramatic.
On Tuesday, Scottish MSP Jim Hume launched a proposal that aims to see smoking banned in all Scottish vehicles where children are present - and while the policy is undeniably a step in the right direction, it also completely lacks ambition.
Smoking when pregnant can triple the risk of a child succumbing to a major cause of meningitis, research has shown. Inhaling
The Government has launched an advertising campaign on the "hidden dangers" of second-hand smoke to young children. New TV
International studies show that, in the overall scheme of things, smoking is a very minor distraction compared to fellow passengers, unruly children, changing a CD or retuning the radio. Perhaps we should ban them too, just in case.