secondary education

Within schools, discussion of such caring roles would be a good start, helping all young people understand the reality of other people's lives. Most of all, we need to make sure they are able to be young.
The government has announced for the third time in 15 years that they intend to impose a baseline test on four-year-old children
I feel privileged to witness the positive impact my work has had upon individuals, upon schools and through advising on policy, upon the education system itself. Coming out to a whole school community was indeed the most profound thing I have ever done. We carry on with hope in our hearts, the battle for real equality is only just beginning. Authentic identity should never be a privilege.
Time brings depth. With a narrow, exam-focused curriculum, we are doing our children an injustice if we don't invest in PSHE. Its teaching can help remove barriers, improve academic outcomes and help young people make informed choices. It surely isn't asking too much to give them the information they might need to handle difficulties better and the space to consider them.
How much further can we go before we are forced to admit that continuously saving money could mean we have to rescue education? The conversation must continue, but its focus needs to change. Let's stop talking about cuts and start talking about investment.
In our everyday lives, we need to be creative. Things come up that we didn't plan for: problems we didn't imagine we would
If it's difficult for us to discern the difference between fact, opinion and outright mistruths, just think how hard it is for our children. They are constantly subjected to this and, given the impact of social media, more intensely than we were at their age
Until 2005, all but a few students took a language in Key Stage 4. They were given the opportunity to develop critical thinking
Shockingly three quarters of adults admitted they cannot work out how much sugar they should be eating from reading packets because their maths skills are too poor. A report from Unicef last week gave further credence to this, finding Britain 25th out of 37 wealthy nations for its equality levels in children's maths and science skills, as well as reading.
Primary school children in Tanzania. Credit: Frans Peeters It is extremely good news to hear that the United Republic of