sex-discrimination

As the licence fee is compulsory, I think it is right we know where the money is spent and whom it is spent on. But we need to have full disclosure, not this halfway house. I think the BBC is amazing value for money but it is not without serious flaws. The debate around pay may help it address some of those issues.
Absent any legislative change, it seem that it will be left to people like Ms Thorp to take action, it's likely that this will be mainly through 'naming and shaming' via social media. In the meantime, it's likely that stereotypical views of what women ought to look like will continue to be perpetuated.
British society, Japanese society - the super ageing workforce will demand common sense liberal measures in both cases. We can learn a lot by considering how other people do things, despite our cultural differences - or maybe because of them.
Justice is the foundation stone for equality and without it, women and girls are enormously disadvantaged politically, economically and socially. At a minimum, legal equality gives women and girls a level playing field from which to build their capabilities and make meaningfully contributions to society.
This is the Mummy Track. A subtle quirk of the workplace which somehow manages to circumvent equal employment legislation and allows pregnant women and mothers to be shamefully discriminated against.
Update: The House of Commons said it had records of 8 employment tribunal causes involving MPs' staff since May 2010, but
What, you may ask, has a woman's pubic hair (abundance or lack thereof) got to do with starting a debate around the expectations
As broadcasters, hospital workers and members of the public line up to voice their concerns about TV presenter Jimmy Savile's
An off-duty fireman was left feeling like a "potential pedophile" after a national airline stopped him sitting next to two