sexualisation

Hugh Hefner, the American businessman behind Playboy magazine, has died of natural causes aged 91. He founded the men's magazine in 1953, with the image of the Playboy Bunny becoming a cultural symbol that has seen global recognition and success
If I was worried about sexualising schoolgirls in 1998 it's nothing compared to how I feel about this in 2016. Historical child abuse claims are firmly in the spotlight and high profile cases involving celebrities, politicians and others have resulted in a heightened awareness and understanding of the extent of the problem.
My mother recently wrote an article in the Daily Mail addressing how she raised me and my 15 year old sister to be respectable and kind towards other women and wear whatever clothes we feel comfortable in. The article got a lot of mixed attention...
The Sun enthusiastically reported Zoella 'cast off her squeaky clean image to pose in her knickers.' and was 'ditching her wholesome image' whilst the Mail Online questioned whether she was 'trying to widen her fanbase?'
In this day and age where covering up and modesty are looked upon as something inappropriate, the people that do choose to wear clothes that cover their bodies fully are looked on as being different, strange even. What if we stopped stereotyping?
Unless you've been living in a cave over the past few days, you may have come across Kim Kardashian's bum "breaking the internet". Predictably, the public's reaction, for the most part, was of shock and not awe. Why would it be? This is Kim Kardashian. She's 'known' for being cheap. Tacky. Tasteless. Plus, she's ethnic and she has got a huge ass.
In a bid for attention, female celebrities from Beyonce to Miley Cyrus have taken the feminist movement backwards by years. By wearing next to nothing in their music videos they are sending the wrong message to young girls and boys.
It's not just about the twerking. It's about working, and it's about living. In a strange way, many women have to metaphorically twerk at work and in their private lives, and it's time for this to stop.
The problem with the Cyrus's new clip is not its risqué visual; former Hannah Montana is hardly the first tween star trying to reinvent herself by gambling on her sexuality. The trouble is that the video directed by the "edgy" fashion photographer Terry Richardson displays a women totally stripped of her own passions and desires, and converts Cyrus to wank material.
To me, feminism is the belief that all human beings are created equal and that women are human beings. Anyone who signs up to this principle, realises that it is not currently in play and thinks there's something not right about that can count themselves a feminist.
No More Page 3 has never asked for parliamentary time or legislation, it does not affiliate itself to a particular party, it enjoys the support to those with the common sense and insight to realise the time has come for change.
David Cameron's new advisor on childhood, Claire Perry MP, says parents should take clearer responsibility for seeing what their children are saying on Facebook and texting on mobile phone, but i'm not sure spying is the answer.
The NSPCC did a qualitative study of children in the phenomenon of verbal sexualisation through 'sexting', a form of communication that adults have little control over. Kids are receiving their first phones at younger ages, giving them a sense of privacy at around 10 or 11.
We are constantly bombarded with messages in society that suggest, either directly or indirectly, that 'young' and 'sexy' go hand in hand. The new Kingsmill advert is a good example and it's already stirred up some controversy.
A school is looking forward to a skirt-free future after banning pupils from wearing the "inappropriate" clothing. Haute
The anticipation at Bieber's balls finally becoming legitimate fantasy territory is nothing new. Kisses from child stars are usually the dream sequence of only fellow children, but that's never been enough for the world of showbiz; adults have long wanted to get into the act of crushing on super-talented underage celebrities.
Do we really live in a world where anything goes? According to the BBC's Cherry Healey, we do. In a recent programme, 'How to Get a Life' on BBC One, she repeated this statement more than once.
At long last there is a reality check going on about the dangers children face on the internet from pornography.
Last week, four-year-old Maddy Jackson appeared on the US reality show 'Toddlers and Tiaras' wearing a padded bra. Her mother