sisterhood

When did you last think about Congo? For those of a certain generation it probably reminds you of Um Bongo, the super-sweet
Here's the thing about wild women.... Our wildness is enticing and magnetic. We are enigmatic and exciting and it's in our wildness that we hold magic.
How much power does one dress have? Image credit Justin Lambert The dress - a symbol of woman - oppression, femininity, frivolity
Unless you've been underneath an Instagram rock lately you would have seen the ever growing group of females, mostly all Mum's, taking over your feed and flooding you with their Kick-Ass vlogs, blogs and books. And, it certainly is impressive.
We must teach both our girls and our boys that each of us is responsible for our own actions. No matter our gender. And whether it is at school, or work, or in taxis, we must therefore seek to tackle behaviour that is unacceptable, not marginalize those who suffer it.
When people want to tell us who we are, it's important to consider what they have to say. They may have something to teach us. But their perspective is based on their experience. Ultimately, they must be heard through the filter of the love you have for yourself. Don't take somebody else's word over your own heart. That is resilience. 
"Strong women don't hate, they collaborate." Unknown Over the past two decades I have run several successful businesses and
Let me tell you, if you're sat there thinking we've got this sisterhood business completely sorted, then you are mistaken. There's a whole mountain range of stuff we still need to get sorted, and pronto, if we want to be happier, calmer, stronger and more confident.
When it comes to Down's syndrome, the most common genetic disorder effecting one in every thousand babies in the UK, we usually hear the stories through the parents' perspective. To them, it is nothing short of a "near-death experience": once it happens, you have a complete different outlook on life, everything you think you know changes and you have to learn how to live and love your new circumstances but in the end, you wouldn't have it any other way...
My dear friend, you're going through a really rough patch, I can see it in your eyes. As a newly-minted Mum, you're still rocked to the core by the brutality of a difficult birth. You still feel like you are watching it over and over again as a third person, suspended from the ceiling in the delivery suite, no longer an active participant in the choices that may affect you for years.