skills shortage

Technology is changing virtually every aspect of our lives in this mobile, hyper-connected age. It's easy to see why, when most of us carry at least one device with us at all times and we literally have an app for everything.
Having seen first hand, numerous young people including my family and friends who are being turned off from studying STEM subjects at an early stage is concerning (and quite upsetting strictly from a Chemical Engineering student perspective). So it's rudimentary we act with urgency, and in a manner to spark interest while inspiring them to consider engineering careers.
Politicians aren't known to agree, but they did reach a consensus on one thing last week: how poor careers advice is in the UK. That's probably not surprising to anyone who's recently come through the school system, which is why representatives of the three major political parties are calling for huge improvements.
At this time of year, with the latest devices and gadgets packed, parceled and delivered, it's easy to take for granted all
Excitement really has started to kick on apprenticeships lately and it's starting to look encouraging - we might even get it onto the election agenda as a policy!
The skills gap in UK science and engineering industries is now an accepted fact of life with companies reporting difficulties in current recruitment of skilled staff. However, an initiative called Industrial Cadets, supported by government and led by major manufacturers, offers the opportunity of engaging future recruits while still at school, thereby developing the future talent pipeline.
To be competitive, firms need to streamline processes, raise productivity and meet targets. Yet real innovations often demand a little time dawdling in the slow lane, thinking rather than ticking boxes.
This September kids up and down the country returned to school to find that alongside the traditional subjects of Maths, English and Science, three new areas of study in computer science, digital skills and IT had been introduced to the national curriculum.
Since the election, output for every hour worked has not gone up - it's gone down, whilst output per worker has followed the same trajectory. We're actually less productive than we were in 2010. This appalling record is far worse than the last years of the 1970s, long deemed the moment when 'British disease' reached its peak.
Huge progress has been made in recent years to address the gender disparity in the construction sector, admittedly from an extremely low starting point - but with just 8.5% of UK engineers women, much more needs to be done quickly to not only address the gender gap but to avert a skills shortage in the UK construction and engineering industry.
The work undertaken by STEM companies - both large and small - is extremely important, not just to our economic future, but to the development of our world. Only by ensuring an increased supply of high quality engineering talent will companies like ours be able to flourish.
The key to starting to unlock a young person's potential really can be as simple as treating them as such - not succumbing to stereotypes and really listening to them. It may sound obvious but it is a large part of the reason why three in four young people supported by The Trust move into work, education or training.
I spoke openly about what I believe excellence to look like when developing qualifications and skills from my own experience as Chief Executive of AAT at the Skills Summit in January.
Businesses are struggling to fill the skills gap but could lack of English language training be the problem? According to the government's skills watchdog, a sharp rise in skills shortages in the UK threatens to hold back the pace of recovery in parts of the economy.
2013 was an eventful year in ERP, with notable positive developments including the increase in mobile and business intelligence (as many predicted twelve months ago) and the increase in adoption of SaaS and cloud solutions. The year saw a number of major ERP implementations, with successes and failures at all levels.
Let's start by looking at the most in demand skill set for tech companies - web development. There are currently 3,000 open tech jobs in London startups alone. When looking at the sector as a whole those vacancies represent a glaring hole in the UK labour pool.
The government this week signed an agreement which means our looming energy crisis will be solved by nuclear power stations built by the French and owned, in part, by the Chinese. This demonstrates the impact of Britain's skills shortage and our lack of ambition. To top it all, they have warned us that the dearth of hi-tech engineering skills in our economy may hold them back. The skills shortage is not a problem confined to the crucially important energy sector, it's systemic. We need more engineers and scientists.
Unless action is taken now, the reality of the UK skills shortage is here is stay. If the government is serious about long-term economic recovery, filling the ever-widening talent gap must be a priority. The alternative is to leave huge numbers of skilled roles unfilled. That will lead to reduced investment, lower GDP growth, lower future job creation and condemn thousands of people to long-term unemployment.
UK businesses are not helping the skills shortage by demanding that employees commute to and from offices. If companies enabled their employees to work from anywhere they could hire the best, most talented candidates regardless of where in the world they live.