slacktivism

This portmanteau covers quite a few elements. It's one thing to say that a 'slacktivist' reaps 'good vibes' from taking action, and something completely different to say that what they've done will provide no real benefit to the cause, and that their 'good vibes' somehow contribute to that.
Unlike hashtag campaigns that have come and gone before, #BringBackOurGirls has unified a global audience and, apart from a microscopic percentage of Boko Haram supporters, the whole world is behind the message, if not the means, of the campaign. Hashtag campaigns about everything from Orca captivity, to gay marriage, to Invisible Children; even the #YesAllWomen hashtag have all divided national and global opinions (rightly or wrongly) where #BringBackOurGirls has united the world's population in solidarity.
Since the dawn of social media, citizens of the social space have been exposed to an ever-increasing number of causes and movements. This in turn has helped to propagate the notion of 'slacktivism', the perception - arguably the delusion - that you can effect change without really doing anything at all.
This morning, pre morning Yorkshire cuppa & in my PJs, I uploaded my bare face to Facebook. Despite my timeline being peppered with contemptuous comments that everyone who takes part is a lazy 'slacktivist', yes, I jumped on the #nomakeupselfie social media bandwagon. Why? Several reasons.
"Here's a picture of me. Beautiful. Bare-faced. Make-up free. Like it. Share it. Validate me. Do the same and I'll validate you. Go on, take a selfie. It's for a good cause LOL!" Tell me, what is the good cause? Who exactly is this benefitting other than the person in the picture, who will undoubtedly be swathed with social endorsements of her natural beauty?
Times of austerity and highly savvy consumers mean challenging times for charities. In order to keep existing supporters and attract new ones, charities need a sound understanding of customers' buying behaviour, attitudes and habits. This is where Response One comes in.
There's all these guides now such as 1001 places you must visit before you die, 1001 books you must read before you die, 1001 movies you must see before you die. Stuff 'em. If you're feeling more Slacker than Activist, see if you can't amble slowly towards one of these chillout zones, but if you're finding it a struggle - have a lie down.
In the autumn of 1998, in the midst of impeachment proceedings against former US President Bill Clinton, a couple from Silicon Valley launched a one-sentence petition online. Their demand of Congress was simple...
If bashing equality-seeking movements is your thing, you'll already be down with the failings of feminism. Exclusionary, ineffective and irrelevant, we're a middle class movement which bolted the drawing-room doors against the masses as suffragettes, and has continued to alienate everybody with a load of intellectual blah-blah ever since.
A war is being fought. Its battlefields are the pages of social networking sites across the globe, and its soldiers are armed with placards and computer cursors. This is the battle of traditional activism versus clicktivism