small business owners

Supporting employees' mental wellbeing is a critical business issue for organisations, but it's hard to know where to start
Has there ever been a more important time to talk about community? What brings communities together, what makes them stick, what grows, supports and nurtures them? How do communities come together when the going gets tough, and how do they celebrate and grow?
Five years is a long time in the life of a small business. In five years the whole world can have changed - staff gone, new team, new office, growth, sometimes decline, changing markets, and not to forget that 40% of small businesses don't make it to five years.... It is this more than anything else that sits at the heart of Small Business Saturday. If we can stop more businesses failing, that can mean huge benefits to communities and the economy as a whole.
No water cooler banter for you, business owner, just the hard graft and isolation of being the sole person in the business
I may be so much more conscious of this issue as a single parent, who is self-employed, runs a charity and has raised two kids 'single handedly'. My girls roll their eyes and mime at this line as it is much used, mainly in an aim to get people to see that if I can do it....anyone can, seriously, anyone can do this.
Millennial women are now more likely to start a business than men. Women really do mean business - sisters are definitely doing it for themselves.
Whilst the typing pool is (mostly) no longer seen as an acceptable target for leering and bottom-pinching, allowing discrimination to flourish unchecked in the guise of official-sounding rules about 'dress code' and 'house styles' is simply not progress enough. The support profession is a vital one, and we all deserve better.
We want to spread that message of hope and optimism to all small businesses - and that is exactly what we are going to do with Small Business Saturday this year. I have found that hope is contagious - so go and spread it around. It is exactly what 2016 needs.
When you see a five-year-old scale an indoor-climbing wall like some kind of mini-Spiderman, you don't immediately think you're in for a workshop on business development. After the adrenaline has worn off (and you're in the pub celebrating your intact bones) a few lessons might just sink in, that could be applied to anyone in business today.
For over 20 years now, the halcyon future of a remote working life style facilitated by digital technology has been waved