small business owners

You may have been toying with writing a book for your business for a while, but you're unsure. You're not good enough to write a business book. You're not sure it's worth the investment. You're terrified at the prospect of self-publishing. You're worried nobody wants to read about your business, and you don't really know what you're talking about anyway...
None of us like being taken for granted in work or at play but owner managers, perhaps more than most, find this behaviour very hard to forgive as by large we have sacrificed so much on our journey.
The senior civil servants, politicians, and people who drafted the legislation do not understand how micro-level ecommerce works.
Most entrepreneurs with ambitions to start their own business generally start by either funding the venture themselves or sourcing early stage investment from friends and family. This is what potential investors expect from very early stage start-up founders.
There are several issues with the logistics of this - especially for micro businesses (a business being run by a single person) using the most basic sales software.
It's easy to be caught up in the excitement of a new business venture, but when it comes to choosing the person with whom you will spend more hours, than your spouse, it is important not to enter into a relationship you may live to regret - there is a lot at stake if goes wrong, but plenty to gain if you get it right.
I believe often managers actively, and mostly inadvertently, suppress innovation. Why? Because people confuse leadership with having to come up with all the best ideas. Since management defined the strategy in the first place they don't want to be diverted from it.
Senior Royal Bank of Scotland executives insisted to MPs that they do good overall as they defended the state-owned bank
A lot of people ask me why I took the plunge from having a dream job at one of the most well-recognised and valuable brands (Rolls-Royce) to starting something where sleeping on the floor of friends' houses became a common event
The Royal Bank of Scotland welcomed a report it commissioned by Clifford Chance which found "no evidence" that it tried to