smart cities

This widespread uptake of autonomous vehicles will re-shape our cities further. With seamless, and instant, on-demand autonomous vehicles, why own a car? Why pay for parking? Why devote so much precious urban real-estate to inanimate metal objects? An MIT study estimated that Singapore could reduce the number or vehicles by two-thirds with full automation.
Not only are all the basics available, but many airports now boast substantial facilities, from restaurants and spas, to swimming pools and lounges that could rival five-star hotels. In fact, airports have in many ways become microcosms of the modern cities they otherwise serve. They also face similar challenges, and need to address these to best serve their "citizens."
With current efforts around the Paris Climate Agreement, sustainability goals are at the top of most governments' agendas. The growth of Earth's population - expected to reach 11 billion people by the end of the century - will also present numerous challenges for natural resources, space and energy, especially when we consider the majority of the population (70%) will live in cities.
Technology is advancing at an exponential rate. We have already seen technologies which were once at the forefront of innovation quickly become out of touch if they did not continually evolve to remain ahead of the tech curve. Who would have thought ten years ago the rise of the smartphone would make the iPod obsolete?
Imagine buying your dream house in the city. Over time, it transforms from a house to a home, one where you build a lifetime's worth of memories. It's close to the shops, to the subway station, to the community centre, and the neighbours become more like family than friends.
It's no secret that, in the 21st century, we take a lot for granted. We've come to rely on technologies and services that even a decade ago didn't exist. Smartphones and internet-based apps are obvious examples here, but I want to draw your attention to another service that is often less considered.
This is not limited to London - if we want to replicate this success across the country, the same principle applies. We are the musketeers fighting all for one and one for all. And I have to say, I find it fitting that as the UK prepares to stand alone on the global stage, it needs to be more together than ever before.
It's predicted that by 2020, there will be more than 20 billion connected things sending data all over the world. Everyday objects, from running shoes to fridges, from fish tanks to vending machines, have the potential to send and receive data from the likes of networks, infrastructure and our mobile phones.
Digital technologies will shape how city administrations interact with citizens, how they deliver services, and how they enable new companies to grow. City leaders I talk to know that this digital future is upon us. But most are still not investing enough in the people and facilities they need to harness these technologies.
In many ways the planning system has done a good job: trying to balance competing demands for scarce resources and mediating between economic forces and the views of local communities. And, over the years, it has proved remarkably resilient.