snowden

The answer to our surveillance dilemma lies in targeted surveillance, a warrant process overseen by the judiciary, an annual parliamentary public scrutiny of the security services, legislated protections for the professional privileges of doctors and lawyers and, most of all, a proper and lengthy public debate void of vague and fear inducing inferences to terror plots and criminal gangs.
Whistle-blowing is perhaps the greatest safeguard to the rule of law, it is a fundamental part of how democracy works.
It is highly unlikely that the people charged with supervising our security services have any idea how algorithmic surveillance works. It is also highly unlikely that the people at GCHQ are going to enlighten them.
Two years after first finding refuge in Ecuador's embassy in London, Julian Assange shows no sign of leaving his adoptive home; and for good reason. With British police on round-the-clock surveillance posted in front of the redbrick building, and with a European Arrest Warrant in his name over allegations of rape in Sweden, Assange has a lot to worry about...
In addition, computer and IT education from kindergarten to university studies was fundamentally revised. Basic understanding of the operation of computers and information networks became as normal as reading and writing.
owever powerful the pressure to conform, to take the cheque and keep quiet, there will always be those who, moved by injustice, will speak out. But it counts for little, unless we all speak out together.
Snowden has shown us that in the digital world a level of surveillance is possible and practiced that would never have been accepted in analogue democracies. Now people start to rebel
By its very nature, the Internet crosses borders, languages and jurisdictions. It is also a technical beast, demanding a certain level of standardisation in order to function as a truly global commons rather than as a series of siloed networks.
Edward Snowden could be granted amnesty to return to the United States, the NSA official who is in charge of assessing the
At Amnesty we work with people that quite literally put their lives on the line in exposing human rights abuses. They often do so at great risks to themselves and their families and it is vital that the space for confidential communications is protected and respected. This is why it is critical that the UK government delivers a full open and transparent investigation into our concerns.