sobriety

If you don't drink for medical, religious, health or other reasons, decide beforehand what explanation you're prepared to share with people and what you're not. Remember, when all is said and done, it really is no one else's business but your own.
Within minutes of entering The Brink my expectations had been demolished. The pub was full of normal looking people (not a depressing looking drunk in sight), light poured into a big space from huge skylights, the décor was inspiring, the artwork on the wall was good and the music intriguing.
Starting after this Bank Holiday weekend. On Tuesday 5th of May, I'm inviting anyone who wants to to join a How To Be A Sober Girl 30 Day Kickstart. It's going to involve as little online support, and as much getting you out of the house, away from bloody internet forums as you can possibly fit in.
Sobriety for the sake of it has a very short shelf life. So knock it on the head. Today. Delete your blog you were busy writing on the brave struggle you are having today on your staring-at-the-four-walls sobriety and write one about learning to play the banjo instead.
I confess, there's a part of me which liked seeing someone else get drunk. It was terrible yet magnificent. I liked the thrill of being on the edge looking down at the feeding shark, in a frenzy of pain but also unbridled chaos and freedom.
Is that why they call it Memory Lane do you think? Because we make the past so narrow by filtering for it what suits us to remember? My drinking days were not all bad. Even in my worst of times. It's wrong of me to pretend otherwise.
Dry January was never really too daunting, given three-quarters of October, November and December all passed in a state of complete sobriety. My dirty little secret - drinking coca cola at parties and telling white lies by hinting I had already had enough that night - is well and truly and out. I'm as sober as a judge, people.
You have a perpetual supply of wine to recycle as gifts. Yes, people still give me bottles of the stuff; they 'forget' that I 'don't really drink anymore' and still do not believe the 'No, not ever, not even one' part of the answer.
I make no secret of the fact that I don't like addiction counsellors. The methods they work from are totally outdated. They are obsessed with dragging up the past instead of focusing on the present... most of all I dislike them because an addiction counsellor is a role undertaken by people who leave Rehab and don't know what to do with their lives.
The biggest reason we have such a prolific alcohol abuse problem is because we refuse to take responsibility for our own actions. The reason that any attempts at sobriety are so protracted is that we are actively encouraged to lay the blame at everyone else's door but our own.