sobriety

There is nothing scarier or more liberating than people typing out verbatim everything we have ever felt about our drinking. Even the stuff we won't say out loud. Especially the stuff we don't say out loud. Because if we didn't say it then how do they know?
Width in sobriety is new friends, fresh places, activities and perspectives. People who are very newly sober but have worked this out will not drink again. There a direct correlation between people who embrace a full sober life, (and this concept of width) and successful sobriety.
Alcoholism is not something any of us would choose to deliberately, consciously pursue as a lifestyle. But whether we persuade ourselves into it, or are hooked from day one, the fact remains that it is still behaviour. Not affliction.
One phrase that gets massively overused is "drinking at something". When life throws you a crap day or a bad situation and we use it as an excuse to drink. Drinking "at" that person, or scenario. Supposedly it's overcome by dealing with our feelings and reactions in a different way. Learning new coping skills.
If you're going to walk around acting like a self-righteous pr*ck because you are doing it dry this January, people will hate you. Deservedly. Do dry January quietly and happily. Then you will still have friends in February. Always a bonus.
An age of sobriety is developing amongst Britain's students as they struggle to cope with the steep rise in tuition fees
This year I've been talking a lot about addiction. Why we are failing. What we are doing wrong. Why our failure rates are so bloody high. I shout a lot about mainstream recovery groups. How I believe they purport relapse and accept semi-permanent recovery as the norm. I was wrong.
I don't believe in protecting people from the opinions of others. In fact I find it faintly ridiculous that people devote so much time to worrying on the behalf of other people. Acting like addicts are a bunch of unruly 5 years olds, likely to go off on the tear after reading a well-versed piece of prose on drinking. It's not dangerous to display these views. It's eye-opening.
A wedding can be many things depending on whereabouts you are on the sliding scale of alcohol abuse-to-alcoholism. If you're abusing it to the point people haven't really picked up on yet, then it's a great excuse to drink in a dysfunctional way with people who don't have alcohol problems... If you're at the stage where you suspect you have a problem and everyone around you shares that suspicion, then its stressful.
It's not Rihanna's job to live up to our ideal of the perfect role model for young women. She expresses herself for a living. She's very good at it. Right now she's young and spends a lot of time going out. She's really no different from other girls her age in that respect. She just does it on a bigger scale - and we all get to come along for the ride.