Social Action

If ever there was a time for bold, brave focussed leadership in the voluntary and community sector, at both national and local level, surely it is now? And this must particularly be case in respect of the local community and small charity sector, which are the backbone of strong communities and the catalyst for local social action.
I have such a vivid memory of sitting in a geography lesson at school when I was 14 or 15, exasperated by boredom as the teacher systematically made us memorize information about soil that seemed to have little, if any, relevance to my everyday life...
"We must campaign for social justice, equality and a fairer society. We should not be intimidated by Government, our regulator
I am so proud of the great things that Scouts do in local communities up and down the country. Now, with the launch of A
Though it may be a life without my Mum, there is a life waiting for me. Whatever happens outside of me, I am still me and I can still achieve amazing things. Hope and gratitude are so fragile, but so important. I am grateful for the brilliant people around me who lift me up, inspire me to hope for the future, and be the best version of myself that I can be.
As you yourself have found, service offers a common meeting ground. It can be a great equalizer that's not interested in social divisions and it has the potential to make everyone who's willing to take part great. But not everyone has an interest in becoming a soldier or the military.
The outcome of the General Election has significant implications for the voluntary and community sector (VCS). At both a local and national level, it must now respond - in a constructive but principled manner.
Consensus is the last word you'd normally associate with General Elections but following on from "I agree with Nick" - the unlikely catchphrase of spring 2010 - five years later it looks like the Conservatives, Labour and the Liberal Democrats have found something else to agree on. Each of these parties has included a commitment to youth social action and volunteering in its manifesto.
Every charity will have its own policy agenda that it will wish to pursue, and many will (I fervently hope) have been promoting these agendas, locally and nationally, over the last few years, prior to the forthcoming general election campaign.
The reality is that the political landscape has changed, and young people view the political process in a distinctly different way to older voters (although I suspect this disparity is beginning to shift).