soft skills

Our new study Everyone In, based on a survey carried out by YouthSight, uncovers the importance of taking notice of student
Last week, KPMG released employee data proving that businesses can increase social mobility. The statistics show that the
Progressive London based youth educational charity Futureversity bridges the skills gap with the provision of innovative
Technology may be neutral but how it impacts on work and who benefits is not. Our politics - and public policy - will remain vital in shaping these outcomes, and ensuring that Uber works for us and we don't end up working for Uber.
It's not just about qualifications. It's not just about education or background. How do I know? Because I didn't excel in either of these areas - instead, I actually put my own success down to something called soft skills - the vital skills such as communication, teamwork and time management which everyone needs to succeed at work and beyond.
Despite all the talk of a fresh political landscape and the dawning of a new era of government by coalition, here we are
I recall memorising the timeline of human prehistory when I was twelve - Paleolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic - from the fresh first pages of my history textbook. It was past midnight, and their quirky names numbed my tongue and befuddled my brain. Nevertheless, I forcibly committed them to memory, motivated by the promise that hard work at school will one day pay off...
Giving children the opportunity to develop abilities such as understanding how their behaviour affects others, learning from their mistakes and trying out new activities would all be considered an important part of character education.
Getting good grades can of course open the door to a promising future, but more employers are stressing the importance of soft skills... we need to address the skills shortage and ensure that young people are better prepared for the world of work in order to bolster this economic growth.
It was demoralising to see The Times' report that "almost a quarter of graduate employers have complained of being unable to fill vacancies despite record numbers of school leavers going to university." Once again, a 'mismatch' between what graduates can offer and the knowledge and skills asked for by employers has been blamed.