Sports performance

People often ask me what we can learn from these phenomenal people. Is there anything we can do to enhance our own performance from following their lead?
Staying on top of the latest research in health, fitness and strength and conditioning can be confusing - there's so much of it, and so much of it is conflicting. But I've looked at the research that came out in February and picked out five gems you can use in your training straight away.
This model explains why you react a certain way in certain situations. It's not how you the human would behave, but the inner chimp or computer takes over and you carry out an action based on jumping to a conclusion rather than the human side of the brain that would look for facts.
Here's the question: for a healthy individual already achieving relatively high protein intakes from diet alone, say in excess of 90-100 grams/day (the British Dietetic Association recommends levels of 55 grams a day), is there any merit in advocating additional supplementation?
Creatine: it's a supplement discussed in hushed, foreboding tones around the gym lockers, and rarely mentioned outside of sporting circles, such is its social stigmatisation. It's the sporting world's 'entry drug', give in to the dark side embracing the 'Big C' and you're on the fast track to an obligatory doping scandal.
Drinks, trainers and protein shakes which purport to be performance enhancing have a "striking lack of evidence" to back